1halffull's Blog


Biscuits, Milk and Gravy?
April 11, 2010, 12:35 am
Filed under: Biscuit World, Food, Humor, Life, Memories, Waffle House

Today was a beautiful day.  Sun shining, flowers blooming, trees in full bud.  A gorgeous day.

We headed out to buy ‘biscuits, milk and gravy’ as my husband said. 

“Gravy?” I questioned?  “Are you thinking we should go to Waffle House?” I continued. 

“Not really. Why?” he volleyed back.

“Because, you just said we were going out to go buy biscuits, milk and gravy,” I responded. 

He chuckled, shaking his head at what he’d said.  “No, I meant dog biscuits, milk and juice.” 

We laughed, then he asked if I wanted to go any place first.  I elected Kohl’s as I’m still looking for a dress to wear to our nephew’s wedding next week.  Plus, we needed to get cat food and litter for Mr. Finicky and the pet store is in the vicinity.  It didn’t hurt that Waffle House was on the way.  All the talk of biscuits and gravy had given me a taste for it, but I didn’t want to be obvious, so I figured I’d wait to see if Dan would get the same idea.

As we got closer, suddenly he said, ‘Well, hey.  Do you want to get a waffle?” 

I know it’s called Waffle House, but after all that talk of biscuits and gravy, how could he even think I’d be looking for a waffle?  “Actually, I was thinking biscuits and gravy after all that talk earlier.”  So we pulled in, each of us with our own ideas for what Waffle House might provide us.

Suddenly it brought back a goofy event also involving, well almost anyway, biscuits. 

Back in 1989 my brother-in-law decided to get married in his home in North Carolina.  I won’t bore you with all the details of that very interesting event, although if I did, you seriously wouldn’t believe it!  I’ll just get right down to the biscuit part. 

We were on our way home.  I was driving our van with my sister-in-law riding shot gun through the hills of West Virginia.  Dan and her husband were in front of us driving with the kids.  That part was quite happy for Judi and me.  Anyway, we decided we wanted something to eat.  In particular, I wanted ice cream.  We were getting close to Charleston and began looking for a place to stop when I spied signs for Biscuit World.  The moment I saw it, I knew that Dan would be drawn to it if I didn’t do something to take control of the situation.  I began to apply the pedal to the metal and sped ahead of him. 

“What are you doing?” asked Judi.  “You must be going 85 miles and hour!” 

“87.  But who’s counting?” I responded.

“But why are you going so fast?  Are you trying to kill us?”

“No, I’m not trying to kill us.  I’m trying to find someplace that sells ice cream before Dan has a chance to head off to Biscuit World!” I exclaimed.  “If we don’t find someplace fast, we’ll find ourselves eating biscuits and grits instead of ice cream with hot fudge.”

We did manage to outrun him and missed out entirely on Biscuit World.  Of course, all involved looked like they’d gone through a wind tunnel thanks to my preference for speed.

Today’s adventure to Waffle House got us both what we wanted but only after Dan nearly didn’t get a waffle, because the waitress forgot to turn in his order.  Instead, he ended up getting two for the price of one because the waitress felt bad for messing up. 

We both enjoyed the meal and no one looked like they’d been through a wind tunnel when we were done.

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Asking the wrong questions
December 11, 2009, 3:15 am
Filed under: Ecology, Food, Global Warming, Government, Legacy, Pollution, Storms

This morning, well actually for the last few days, the talking heads were batting global warming around like a tennis ball made of silly putty. 

Here’s how the ball bounces:  The Al Gore-ites are all for it.  A number of scientists are skeptical. 

Big Al has looked into it via the internet that he invented.  He pretty much knows what’s going on and even made a documentary that got on public TV and won him a peace prize.  He wanted us to know so we’d stop doing the stuff that caused global warming in the first place.

The scientists, on the other hand, are skeptical of Big Al’s contention.  Their point is that it’s difficult to prove that current weather patterns are caused by global warming.  They contend that it’s very possible that the current weather patterns are nothing more than part of a recurring, historical cycle.  This cycle is not very well documented because Al Gore didn’t invent the internet till the mid-1950’s, so people didn’t have many concrete methods to make note of previous weather cycles.  At least not by methods that stand up to scientific examination.  Pictures on cave walls don’t seem to count for much.

But I digress….

Here’s what I think:  People are asking the wrong questions and concerned about the wrong stuff.

Sit down for a moment.  Now, write down all the names of people who you know have cancer or had cancer in the last 10 years even if they are already dead.  Next, if you’re over age 35, write down the names of all the people you remember who had cancer 25 years ago.   Compare the list. 

If you’re like me, your list of currently knowns with cancer (or recently deceased from the disease) is much longer than the list from 25 years ago.  Hmmmm….

For an interesting road trip that will add more information to our sudo-scientific search, go out for a ride through the countryside.  Tell me how many new ‘mountains’ (or at the minimum, very large hills) you see that you don’t remember being there when you were a kid.  I’m thinking you’ll see a significant number. 

Those are garbage dumps that are buried to look like mountains.  They’re springing up everywhere!  Their stench in some places pollutes the air; their decay leaches into our water systems.  One of these days, Columbus will no longer be nestled on the flat plains of Ohio.  It will rest among the mountains.

If you live in the Youngstown area, stand outside for an hour and count how many very large C planes use your house as landing directionals in take off and landing maneuvers from the local air base.  If it’s a clear day, tell me what you see as they fly over.  If you said a cascading gray emission coming out of the back of the engines, you’d be correct! 

What is that?  It’s the exhaust debris.  Where is it going?  Into our watershed, onto our crops, into the grass that cows are eating and consequently, into our bellies to be spread throughout our bodies.  It’s called toxic waste and it messes with something in our bodies known as ‘free radicals’.  Not good.

I”m not picking on the Air Force.  Their gunk is just more visible. 

We also need to be highly aware of all the pesticides used on crops and even our lawns. 

Here’s what we’re told about that:  As long as you wash the produce, the fruit, the potatoes, etc., you’ll be fine.  Uh, I don’t think so.  That stuff they put on the crops to kill the weeds, kill the bugs, grow uber tomatoes (that taste like straw) and delicious apples the size of a baby’s head, is sprayed across the crops, lands in the ground, is sucked up by the plant’s roots, embedding itself in something that you’re going to buy at the store or the local farm market then eat.  Where will it go? Into your belly to ‘nourish’ your body.

So, what’s the problem?  The problem is that your body doesn’t recognize that junk.  Your body wasn’t created knowing what to do with the unrecognizable.  Sometimes it will manage to expel it; unfortunately, more often the junk is deposited into your body tissue, your organs – pancreas, liver, kidneys, lungs.  The body tries very hard to deal with it and does for awhile.  But then it can’t deal anymore. 

Next thing you know, you’re on the list you just made of people you know who have cancer or MS, or MD, or any number of diseases that can’t deal with a ruptured ecology.

So how’d we get here?  Greed.   People learned that if they used chemicals, they could improve their produce, improve their crop sales, make more money.  Steel and oil barons learned that they could build empires worth billions while easily forgetting that their sludge and run off was going directly into our water sources.  The tobacco companies started with a cigarette then built a ‘better’ one, filled with 10 times the nicotine our parents got from each puff.  They used their technology to hook in more consumers, get more sales, fill their greedy coffers with more dollars. 

Americans, in an effort to make life simpler, have created a need for fast foods, bright packaging that sells more products, plastics that won’t break down for thousands of years, and a hellish host of things, including TV’s, computers, furniture and good old every day garbage, that ends up in dumps that are turned into mountains.

The earth shudders.  The weather changes.  The earthquakes come.  The K-Mart closes; the building is torn down; the parking lot is empty.  The earth gets her chance and if you watch carefully, you’ll see her begin to reclaim what is hers.  All’s she needs is a chance.

Will we give her that chance before it’s too late?



How many snacks does it take to feed a Bible Club?
July 12, 2009, 12:50 am
Filed under: Food, Friends, Humor, Snack bags

It takes way more than I can begin to count.  Well not really.  After working on them all afternoon, I know exactly how many we made:  300.

brown-bagThat’s what my two friends and I did today.  Made up lunch bags full of mostly junk food snacks – the best kind, of course – for unknown numbers of kids who will attend our church’s first Backyard Bible Clubs next week.

The fun started last week when Dan and I went to several stores to price items that might be used in the snack bags.  It was an all-afternoon adventure that left me with five pages of notes about what kind of items I might use, how many in a container, prices, and flavors.

Friday morning this week, my dear friend Connie took me to Sam’s Club (I don’t have my own membership) so we could get everything we needed.  I figured it would be pretty simple, because I came with a full list of items that we’d need for each day.Publication1

I did fine on all the pre-counted items but hit a snag when we got to the bulk items we agreed to purchase and bag up ourselves.  I picked up a box of Oreos and read that there were 10 individually wrapped packs inside.

“Gee, Connie, how many of these boxes do you think we’ll need?”  “I don’t know, June,” she responded.

“I wish I new how many cookies were in this box,” I said as I turned it upside down, round and round as though it might speak up and give me the answer.

I watched as Connie picked up a box and flipped it to where the ingredient list was.  “It says here that a serving size is three pretzelscookies,” she told me.  “It also says that there are 45 servings in this box!”

Well, DUH!  How smart was that!  I sure felt dumber than a fifth grader at that point, but oh so glad Connie gave me my answer.  It made the rest of the shopping go like clock work!  We were out of there in 37 minutes.

Today we got together to assemble the 300 bags.  Kathy joined us around our kitchen table and we all bagged up the food items.  Next came the assembly process.  For awhile, we each worked individually for awhile which seemed to take forever!  Finally, Connie (again) sped things up when she organized us into an assembly line!  I wish I’d thought of thatsnk_austin_wheat_cheddar_crackers_45ct – we’d have been done so much sooner.

Everyone persevered to get the job done.  My dining room is filled with snack bags just waiting to be handed to some lucky child.  Hopefully, they’ll learn at least as much in the Backyard Bible Clubs as I did in the Backyard Snack Making Club.